November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

Challenges and solutions of using black tray materials

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

1 Information provided by NAPCOR from the studies Cradle-to-resin life cycle analysis of polyethylene terephthalate resin (March 2020) and Life cycle impacts for post-consumer recycled resins: PET, HDPE, and PP (December 2018). All data sources may be found on this link.
November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

Challenges and solutions of using black tray materials

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

Challenges and solutions of using black tray materials

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

Challenges and solutions of using black tray materials

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

Challenges and solutions of using black tray materials

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.

November, 2023

Black tray materials are very commonly used for food packaging because they allow colorful foods to stand out. For example, in the USA market, black trays are especially used for meats, and they convey a premium message to consumers. While these trays are utilized because they are appealing to customers, they do present an issue in the face of sustainability.

The most prominent issue with black trays is that they are hardly ever recycled. At recycling plants, plastics are normally sorted by optical sorting systems with machines that use near infrared light to spot the different materials passing through the recycling stream. The carbon black, common in most black plastic, is not seen by these sorting machines. The carbon black pigmentation absorbs the light from the emitter, which prevents the sensors from identifying the product as recyclable.  As a result, most of these trays end up in landfill.

One solution to this issue is the use of IR Black colorant, which can reflect infrared wavelengths and be sorted by the machines, and therefore be recycled. In order to fill this “black hole” in recycling, a packaging change to NIR-detectable technology needs to be made so that black plastic can be separated and recycled.

A few years back, Evertis realized this need and launched the IR Black product line, barrier PET films that are formulated with an IR Black masterbatch that is detectable by the current sorting technology in recycling processes, and carbon black free. This product line that was especially valued by clients in Europe, where “eco-design”, or designing packaging considering sustainability concerns, became an industry trend ahead of other markets, and the creation of a recycling stream for black plastics became viable.

By using black pigments that do not hinder the sorting process, but instead make packaging easily identifiable, film suppliers can allow for more economical sorting and recycling of black plastic products as well the possibility of greater take-up by recovery facilities.